Yield curve

Latest Stories

Oil Prices Continue to Climb Higher

By David O'Malley | November 6, 2017

Last week Jerome Powell was nominated as the next Federal Reserve chairman. In addition to this key announcement other market-moving data, including the employment report, tax bill and treasury refunding,… Read More

Stocks Make a New High

By David O'Malley | September 18, 2017

The S&P 500 closed above the 2,500 mark for the first time on Friday. The markets ended a strong week of gains driven by continued favorable conditions for economic growth and the prospects for potentially bipartisan action coming out of Washington.

Hurricane Recovery and Economic Impact

By David O'Malley | September 11, 2017

The one-two punch of Hurricanes Harvey and Irma has impacted so many in Texas, Florida and throughout the Southern part of the U.S. We keep all of those impacted in our thoughts and wish them a speedy recovery.
Markets will be looking at how these two storms will impact the economy both in the near term and farther down the line. In the short term, the potential is for the storms to put downward pressure on economic performance and distort statistics (like the rise in unemployment claims last week), but the rebuilding process will be a boost to the economy.

Unexpectedly Weak Employment Report

By David O'Malley | September 5, 2017

The nuclear test by North Korea has brought geopolitical uncertainty to a new level. As I have previously written, it is very hard to trade geopolitical risk so I prefer to stay focused on fundamentals.

Last week’s August employment report was weaker than expectations on almost all aspects. The report comes after stronger employment data earlier in the week. The ramifications of the weaker report bring the odds of a December interest rate increase by the Federal Reserve (Fed) to less than 50/50. The weaker average hourly earnings and sluggish inflation data may keep the Fed on hold until after the holiday spending season.

Beware of a Flattening Yield Curve

By David O'Malley | June 19, 2017

In a much anticipated move last week, the Federal Reserve (Fed) increased short-term interest rates by 25 basis points (bps). The Fed also outlined parameters for shrinking its $4.5 trillion balance sheet. Once the process begins, it is expected to take at least four years to reduce the balance sheet by approximately $2-2.5 trillion.

Political Uncertainties and Resilient Markets

By Zhiwei Ren | February 23, 2017

The first two months of 2016 were challenging times. Global risk assets, especially commodities, were in a free fall and the market was pricing in a global recession and possible hard landing in China. Compared to 2016, the 2017 financial market is having a great start, with all major risk assets performing well year-to-date. The S&P 500 Index has not seen a 1% drop in over 90 trading days, and 3-month realized volatility has not been this low since 1995.

Yield-Hungry Investors Facing a Conundrum

By James Faunce | February 2, 2017

Institutional yield buyers in the fixed income credit markets have been waiting a long time for Treasury rates and absolute yields to increase. Since rates hit lows last summer, it appeared that the move higher in yields was finally going to materialize, particularly following the election results in which 10- and 30-year Treasury rates rose almost 80 basis points (bps). However, the very strong tightening in credit spreads has flattened the industrial credit curve quite substantially. As a result, despite the back-up in long Treasury rates, the all-in yield for long industrial credit has been largely offset.

Stocks Rally on Fed and Economy

By David O'Malley | November 23, 2015

The economic data for the week continued to be solid as unemployment claims fell to 271,000. This data reinforced the market’s view that the U.S. employment conditions continue to improve.

Strong October Employment Number Signals Fed Rate Increase in December

By David O'Malley | November 9, 2015

I have written in the past that increasing wages would be a key indicator for the Fed to start increasing rates. The 0.4% increase in average hourly earnings this past month resulted in the highest year-over-year increase in the past twelve months.

Yuan Devaluation Surprises Market

By David O'Malley | August 17, 2015

Last week’s surprise announcement from the Chinese government devaluing the Yuan affected markets across the globe.



Disclosure Statement

This blog post is for informational use only. The views expressed are those of the author, Dave O’Malley, and do not necessarily reflect the views of Penn Mutual Asset Management. This material is not intended to be relied upon as a forecast, research or investment advice, and it is not a recommendation, offer or solicitation to buy or sell any securities or to adopt any investment strategy.

Any statements about financial and company performance of The Penn Mutual Life Insurance Company or its insurance subsidiaries (each, “Client”) made by the author is provided with a written consent from the Client.  Penn Mutual Asset Management is a wholly owned subsidiary of The Penn Mutual Life Insurance Company.

Read More...

Opinions and statements of financial market trends that are based on current market conditions constitute judgment of the author and are subject to change without notice.  The information and opinions contained in this material are derived from sources deemed to be reliable but should not be assumed to be accurate or complete.  Statements that reflect projections or expectations of future financial or economic performance of the markets may be considered forward-looking statements.  Actual results may differ significantly.  Any forecasts contained in this material are based on various estimates and assumptions, and there can be no assurance that such estimates or assumptions will prove accurate.

Investing involves risk, including possible loss of principal.  Past performance is no guarantee of future results.  All information referenced in preparation of this material has been obtained from sources believed to be reliable, but accuracy and completeness are not guaranteed. There is no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the information and Penn Mutual Asset Management shall have no liability for decisions based upon such information.

High-Yield bonds are subject to greater fluctuations in value and risk of loss of income and principal. Investing in higher yielding, lower rated corporate bonds have a greater risk of price fluctuations and loss of principal and income than U.S. Treasury bonds and bills. Government securities offer a higher degree of safety and are guaranteed as to the timely payment of principal and interest if held to maturity.

All trademarks are the property of their respective owners. This material may not be reproduced in whole or in part in any form, or referred to in any other publication, without express written permission.

Copyright © 2015 Penn Mutual. All Rights Reserved. All trademarks are the property of their respective owners.

Read Less...